Thursday, 18 August 2011

Risk Management and Good Judgement

 

respect-your-elders

An injury that doesn’t happen needs no treatment. An emergency that doesn’t occur requires no response. An illness that doesn’t develop demands no remedy. The best way to stay safe in the outdoors is to avoid getting into trouble in the first place. That requires planning, training, leadership, good judgment, and accepting responsibility—in short, risk management. We manage risk in almost every aspect of our lives. (Boy Scouts of America Fieldbook)

Modern Survival ideology to a large extent, is risk management, or at a very minimum – risk awareness.

“At twenty years of age the will reigns; at thirty, the wit; and at forty, the judgment.”
(Benjamin Franklin)

Good judgement may be the most important trait to successful risk management. The problem is, to an extent, good judgement does not come naturally and is not equally distributed to all human beings.

Good judgement is a learned thing. Will Rogers once said, “Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.”

Good judgement comes from life experience, the knowledge gained from good decisions and bad, and the common-sense that is applied or learned from the situation.

When experiencing, observing or examining the world around us, both local happenings and those afar, many of us are subconsciously judging the events that we see, or read about, and are filing them away in our memory banks, ultimately to be added together with all of our other experiences to form a judgement, opinion, instinct, or decision.

The key is to ‘be aware’ that your experiences and interpretations of them, are adding together to form ‘your judgement’. Be aware that if you are in your 20′s or 30′s, that someone who is in their 40′s or 50′s probably will have better overall judgement.

The old saying, “Respect your elders”… that’s what it means.

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